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Rick Gates, business partner of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, is expected to plead guilty to charges that were brought this week against the two men. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Trump Campaign Aide Rick Gates Pleads Guilty And Begins Cooperating With Russia Investigation

The business partner of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has reached a deal with the office of special counsel Robert Mueller. Manafort, however, continues to maintain his innocence.

Elvedina Muzaferija of Bosnia and Herzegovina start a run during Alpine Skiing women's downhill training on day 10 of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Jeongseon Alpine Centre on Feb. 19, 2018 in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

Despite Frigid Weather, The Snow In Pyeongchang Is Fake

Between 90 and 98 percent of the snow at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games is man-made, says Joe VanderKelen, president of the Michigan-based company that is supplying the snow machines.

White Helmet Khaled Omar Harrah was killed during an airstrike in 2016. He's part of a group of volunteer rescue workers featured in the documentary Last Men in Aleppo (available on Netflix). Courtesy of Grasshopper Film hide caption

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Courtesy of Grasshopper Film

Director Of Oscar-Nominated Aleppo Doc Wants His Film To Serve As Witness

Feras Fayyad's Last Men In Aleppo goes inside the Syrian city at a time when it was being reduced to rubble by government bombings.

Director Of Oscar-Nominated Aleppo Doc Wants His Film To Serve As Witness

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The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 percent to 6 percent of the samples it tested. Joff Lee/Getty Images hide caption

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Joff Lee/Getty Images

FDA Finds Hazards Lurking In Parsley, Cilantro, Guacamole

The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 to 6 percent of the samples it tested.

Entrance to Camps 5 and 6, Naval Station Guantánamo Bay. (photo reviewed and cleared by U.S. military) David Welna/NPR hide caption

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David Welna/NPR

On A Tense Press Tour Of Guantánamo's Prison Complex, Signs Of Expansion

The U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, is ready to accept more detainees who may be sent there under President Trump's newly signed order to keep the facility open.

On A Tense Press Tour Of Guantánamo's Prison Complex, Signs Of Expansion

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Dr. Peter Bakes is an emergency medicine doctor at Swedish Medical Center. Rather than reaching first for opioids for their patients who have severe pain, doctors in his ER have been trained to turn more often now to safer and less addictive alternative medicines, like ketamine and lidocaine. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

These 10 ERs Sharply Reduced Opioid Use And Still Eased Pain

CPR News

Collaboration was key for the 10 emergency rooms that cut opioid prescriptions by 36 percent. Doctors say they now use less addictive medicines to manage pain and have shifted patients' expectations.

President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull speak during a news conference at the White House in Washington on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Trump Reiterates Position On Arming Teachers, As Australian Leader Stays Out Of Debate

When asked about his own country's tight gun control laws, Australia's prime minister Malcolm Turnbull said "we certainly don't presume to provide policy or political advice on that matter here."

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah Courtesy of... hide caption

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Courtesy of...

Christian Scott: Building Bridges Across Cultures

We join Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah for a performance at the New Orleans Jazz Market drawn from The Centennial Trilogy — and explore his work as a bridge-builder, an ambassador and an avatar.

Christian Scott: Building Bridges Across Cultures

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Public radio stations WNYC, KPCC and WAMU announced Friday that they will revive the Gothamist local news sites in their cities. The sites had been shuttered by owner Joe Ricketts in November. WNYC hide caption

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WNYC

Gothamist Properties Will Be Revived Under New Ownership: Public Media

WNYC will buy Gothamist, KPCC will acquire LAist, and WAMU is taking over DCist. The move is funded by two anonymous donors "who are deeply committed to supporting local journalism initiatives."

On the left, a satellite image of the village of Thit Tone Nar Gwa Son on Dec. 2; on the right, the same village seen from space earlier this week. Human rights advocates say the government is destroying what amounts to scores of crime scenes before any credible investigation takes place. DigitalGlobe via AP hide caption

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DigitalGlobe via AP

PHOTOS: Myanmar Apparently Razing Remains Of Rohingya Villages

Satellite images reveal barren landscapes where villages stood just months ago, before Myanmar began its brutal crackdown. Activists fear officials are destroying crime scenes of mass atrocities.

Speedskaters Elise Christie of Great Britain gets by Kim Boutin of Canada and Andrea Keszler of Hungary as they fall during the Ladies' 500m quarterfinal on Feb. 13. "If the pass is gonna be close or tight," says U.S. speedskater J.R. Celski, "we usually say 'bombs,' like 'Uh-oh, something's gonna blow up!' So it's like an explosion. It most likely means people are falling." Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

From 'Bonk' To 'Bombs' And 'Fly Swat': A Guide To Olympic Slang

Olympic sports have their own vernacular — terms that make no sense to outsiders. Much of it has to do with when things go wrong. And some of it has to do with Seinfeld.

From 'Bonk' To 'Bombs' And 'Fly Swat': A Guide To Olympic Slang

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Russian girls stand next to photos of Russia's President Vladimir Putin during the opening of the Sports House, set up to support the Russian delegation of the 2018 Winter Olympics, in Gangneung on Feb. 9. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

What It's Like to Visit Russia's 'Sports House' At The Pyeongchang Olympics

In the shadow of a doping scandal, Russian athletes, friends and fans are gathering at a hospitality venue during the Winter Games. "No alcohol," a man at the door warns visitors.

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