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Stephanie and Natalie enrolled their older son in sessions at a Brain Balance Achievement Center in the hope that it would help him make friends. Hokyoung Kim for NPR hide caption

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR

'Cutting-Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

With 113 locations in the U.S., Brain Balance says its drug-free approach has helped tens of thousands of children. But experts say there's insufficient proof for its effectiveness.

Yvette and Scott, both recovering heroin users, now take methadone daily from a clinic in the Southend of Boston. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

After An Overdose, Patients Aren't Getting Treatments That Could Prevent The Next One

WBUR

An overdose is a wake-up call for many people with addiction. So why aren't patients being offered medications that could keep them from looking for the next dangerous hit of drugs?

After An Overdose, Patients Aren't Getting Treatments That Could Prevent The Next One

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The Air Force currently oversees many of the military's space activities, such as the experimental X-37B spacecraft. Michael Stonecypher/USAF hide caption

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Michael Stonecypher/USAF

Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The Stars

The president wants a "separate but equal branch" of the military to watch over the final frontier, but only Congress can make it happen.

Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The Stars

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The Supreme Court on Monday punted on the merits of partisan gerrymandering. The decision could make it more difficult for challengers of the practice to bring cases in the future. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Leaves 'Wild West' Of Partisan Gerrymandering In Place — For Now

The court on Monday, in twin partisan gerrymandering cases from Wisconsin and Maryland, said either that challengers didn't have standing or didn't weigh in on the merits of the case.

Supreme Court Leaves 'Wild West' Of Partisan Gerrymandering In Place — For Now

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An arrangement of pills of the opioid oxycodone-acetaminophen, also known as Percocet, in New York. A new report finds a link between workforce participation and the prescription rate of opioids in the U.S. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

How The Opioid Crisis Is Depressing America's Labor Force

The U.S. lags behind other countries in workforce participation because more opioids are prescribed in this country, says a report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Ahmed Alaa, shown here in Cairo, spent three months in prison for raising a rainbow flag at the concert of a Lebanese band in Cairo last year. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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After Crackdown, Egypt's LGBT Community Contemplates 'Dark Future'

Homosexuality isn't illegal in Egypt but human rights groups say other laws have been used to target LGBT Egyptians. "Prison killed me. It destroyed me," says an Egyptian woman jailed after a concert.

After Crackdown, Egypt's LGBT Community Contemplates 'Dark Future'

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A resident walks in to cast her vote at a polling station in Maine on June 12, in the state's primary elections. Maine is one of 17 states that has yet to apply for election security money allocated this year by congress. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Bureaucracy And Politics Slow Election Security Funding To States

Congress is giving states $380 million to bolster the security of the 2018 elections. But getting that money out to local election officials has been a slow and laborious process.

Rita Steyn has a family history of cancer so she ordered a home genetic testing kit to see if she carried certain genetic mutations that increase the risk for the disease. Courtesy of Rita Steyn hide caption

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Courtesy of Rita Steyn

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

As home genetic testing continues to boom, more people are getting their DNA tested for health reasons. The tests may signal future disease, but there are many limitations that might falsely reassure.

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

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In this Jan. 10, 2017, file photo, pharmaceuticals billionaire Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong waves as he arrives in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump. Soon-Shiong will take over the L.A. Times on Monday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

New 'LA Times' Owner Wants To Compete With 'New York Times' And 'Washington Post'

Patrick Soon-Shiong takes over the Los Angeles Times on Monday. He said he hopes it will be perceived "not just as a regional paper, but indeed a national paper and hopefully an international paper."

New 'LA Times' Owner Wants To Compete With 'New York Times' And 'Washington Post'

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Cover photo of There There, by Tommy Orange Samantha Clark/NPR hide caption

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Pithy And Pointed 'There There' Puts Native American Voices Front And Center

Fresh Air

Critic Maureen Corrigan says Tommy Orange's novel, which centers on a cast of native and mixed-race characters whose lives intersect at a powwow, features "a literary authority rare in a debut."

Pithy And Pointed 'There There' Puts Native American Voices Front And Center

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Martín Elfman for NPR

Stay-At-Home Dads Still Struggle With Diapers, Drool, Stigma And Isolation

It's hard to find other stay-at-home dads to hang out with, and working men worry you'll hit on their stay-at-home wives. Meanwhile, bosses still expect new fathers to work full-time. What's changed?

Stay-At-Home Dads Still Struggle With Diapers, Drool, Stigma And Isolation

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