New Music Here's what we're listening to.

New Music

Anyone who's had a lousy year would do well to jam Harvey Danger's "The Show Must Not Go On" as the clock strikes midnight. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

'The Show Must Not Go On' by Harvey Danger

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132475287/132410322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Martin Leung's solo piano rendition of the Super Mario theme music underlines the wit and invention of the source material. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

'Mario Solo Piano Medley' by Video Games Live/Martin Leung

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133019117/133018992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In "Turn Off This Song and Go Outside," The Lonely Forest urges listeners to get out of their own heads. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Arrows

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133466446/133466038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Guyz Nite's "Father's Day" is an almost preposterously goodhearted, winningly sincere tribute to Dad. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Father's Day

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91429863/91316533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Carried primarily by the drums, KT Tunstall's "Madame Trudeaux" stomps and rolls with glammy antagonism. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Gang of Four isn't reinventing anything in "Never Pay for the Farm," but its members have a blast with their second lease on life. courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
courtesy of the artist

Content

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131332668/131331671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In "Brains," Oh No Oh My nicely sums up the age-old conflict between thoughts and feelings. Davey Wilson/Courtesy of Shore Fire Media hide caption

toggle caption
Davey Wilson/Courtesy of Shore Fire Media

'Brains' by Oh No Oh My

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133779441/133779437" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">