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New Music

Bejun Mehta's new CD features the music of Handel. Marco Borggreve hide caption

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Marco Borggreve

Alfred Deller sings "music for a While" by Henry Purcell (rec. 1949)

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Incan Abraham's "Hors D'oeuvres" morphs into a psychedelic ballet of adolescent anxiety. Amanda Charchian hide caption

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Amanda Charchian

'Hors D'oeuvres' by Incan Abraham

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Tunng On 'World Cafe: Next'

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The 88's "They Ought to See You Now" is a little more than two minutes of disarming charm and irresistible melodies. Eric Cwiertny/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Eric Cwiertny/courtesy of the artist

'They Ought to See You Now' by The 88

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Gang of Four releases a politically outspoken comeback album in January. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

The Extra Lens' "Only Existing Footage" perfectly encapsulates the way small missteps can bloom into ruin. Max S. Gerber hide caption

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Max S. Gerber

'Only Existing Footage' by The Extra Lens

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Scuba's Paul Rose reworks his song "Before" as "Before (After)," a gem worth more than the sum of its many moving parts. courtesy of the artist/Hotflush Records hide caption

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courtesy of the artist/Hotflush Records

Triangulation

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Without uttering a word in "I'm Jim Morrison, I'm Dead," Mogwai scales a mountain of emotion, and pens poetry with effects pedals. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

'I'm Jim Morrison, I'm Dead' by Mogwai

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(Left to right) Jackie, Tito, Marlon, Michael and Jermaine Jackson. Gems/Redfern hide caption

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Gems/Redfern