New Music Here's what we're listening to.

New Music

In "Waidio," singer Khaira Arby insists that women must be free to pursue their own happiness. Chris Nolan hide caption

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Chris Nolan

Guest DJ Jim Jarmusch Previews The All Tomorrow's Parties Music Festival

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"How Come That Blood" is an old song, but in Sam Amidon's hands, it springs to life as if newly born. Samantha West hide caption

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Samantha West

How Come That Blood

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Courtesy Asthmatic Kitty

Listen to 'I Walked' from Sufjan Stevens

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Tame Impala's "Lucidity" is more about impact than innovation, but the music still stuns on contact. Ben Sullivan hide caption

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Ben Sullivan

'Lucidity' by Tame Impala

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Rana Santacruz offers up a wonderful new spin on an old tune. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

Listen To This Week's Show

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