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In "Turn Off This Song and Go Outside," The Lonely Forest urges listeners to get out of their own heads. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Arrows

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Guyz Nite's "Father's Day" is an almost preposterously goodhearted, winningly sincere tribute to Dad. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Father's Day

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Carried primarily by the drums, KT Tunstall's "Madame Trudeaux" stomps and rolls with glammy antagonism. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Gang of Four isn't reinventing anything in "Never Pay for the Farm," but its members have a blast with their second lease on life. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Content

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In "Brains," Oh No Oh My nicely sums up the age-old conflict between thoughts and feelings. Davey Wilson/Courtesy of Shore Fire Media hide caption

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Davey Wilson/Courtesy of Shore Fire Media

'Brains' by Oh No Oh My

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Sharon Van Etten lets a troubled past lay the groundwork for a tiny mantra to live by: "Love More." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Epic

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Richard Johnson of Drugs of Faith. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Hear "Hidden Costs" by Drugs of Faith

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Campfire OK's "Strange Like We Are" grows as it goes, with handclaps and three-part harmonies culminating in powerful choruses. Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Kyle Johnson/Courtesy of the artist

'Strange Like We Are' by Campfire OK

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The hypnotic "Moon Deluxe" finds Andrew Cedermark (right) enshrouding his guitar and voice in swirling, murky reverb. Sam German/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'Moon Deluxe' by Andrew Cedermark

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In "No One Asked to Dance," Deerhoof proves again that mystery is more seductive than truth. Richard Saunier/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'No One Asked to Dance' by Deerhoof

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After 20 years, The Jigsaw Seen still writes soaring, smart, carefully crafted pop songs like "Where the Action Isn't." Jes Andrade/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jes Andrade/Courtesy of the artist

'Where the Action Isn't' by The Jigsaw Seen

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In "Uskudar," A Hawk and a Hacksaw's members continue to find inspiration in the music of Eastern Europe. Louis Schalk/Courtesy of Rock Paper Scissors hide caption

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Louis Schalk/Courtesy of Rock Paper Scissors

Uskudar

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