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Adam Spencer on the TED stage. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Adam Spencer: Why Are Monster Prime Numbers Important?

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Envy is a useful tool for social comparison. But sometimes, it can lead us to wicked places. Steve Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Steve Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Counting Other People's Blessings

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A biomechanical model of producing an "f" sound with an overbite (left) compared with an edge-to-edge bite (right). Some linguists are arguing that the advent of softer food thousands of years ago led to changes in biting patterns and, eventually, to more frequent use of sounds like "f" and "v" in human languages. Scott Moisik hide caption

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Scott Moisik

There was an uproar in 2018 when a scientist in China, He Jiankui, announced that he had successfully used CRISPR to edit the genes of twin girls when they were embryos. Prominent scientists hope to stop further attempts at germline editing, at least for now. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

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A satellite image from Wednesday morning shows a powerful storm system heading east across the U.S. The storm is expected to bring high winds, snow and rain to much of the central U.S. in the coming days. GOES-East/NOAA hide caption

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GOES-East/NOAA

Solar panels fill a field in Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France. Panoramic Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Panoramic Images/Getty Images

It's 2050 And This Is How We Stopped Climate Change

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An artist's rendering shows a needle-like carbon nanotube delivering DNA through the wall of a plant cell. It also may be possible to use this method to inject a gene editing tool called CRISPR to alter a plant's characteristics for breeding. Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry hide caption

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Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants

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Jonah Reeder prepares a special protein shake that helps him manage a metabolic condition called phenylketonuria. Julia Ritchey/KUER hide caption

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Julia Ritchey/KUER

A Gulp Of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat A Range Of Illnesses

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A rare photo of "type D" killer whales off South Georgia island, located between South America and Antarctica, shows the whales' blunt heads and tiny white eye patches. Courtesy of J.P. Sylvestre hide caption

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Courtesy of J.P. Sylvestre

Mysterious Type Of Killer Whale, Sought After For Years, Found In Southern Ocean

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This colorized scanning electron micrograph shows human cells in a lab infected with "pink" influenza viruses. As many as 650,000 people each year die from flu, according to the World Health Organization. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles (orange) infecting a T cell, one of the white blood cells that play a central role in the immune system. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Bone Marrow Transplant Renders Second Patient Free Of HIV

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A boy rides his bike through still water after a thunderstorm in the Lakewood area of East Houston, which flooded during Hurricane Harvey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich

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Given supportive, nurturing conditions, highly reactive "orchid" children can thrive when tackling challenges, pediatrician and author Thomas Boyce says, especially if they have the comfort of a regular routine. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael H/Getty Images

Is Your Child An Orchid Or A Dandelion? Unlocking The Science Of Sensitive Kids

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It's well-known that junk food ads on TV can strongly influence what kids want to eat. A study finds social media influencers can have the same effect on kids --but not when it comes to healthy foods. Jessica Lee Photography/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Jessica Lee Photography/Getty Images/Image Source

Social Media May Sway Kids To Eat More Cookies — And More Calories

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